First Cow – Postponed

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Postponed Until Further Notice

7:00 PM @ The Ellen Theatre
$9.25-$9.75 (plus fees)

A skilled cook has traveled west and joined a group of fur trappers in Oregon, though he only finds true connection with a Chinese immigrant also seeking his fortune. Soon the two collaborate on a successful, though dubious, business venture. Rated PG13, the film runs 122 min. CC. 94% RT Score.

“A GRACEFUL TALE OF HUMAN CONNECTION SET AGAINST THE BACKGROUND OF THE GREAT AMERICAN WILDERNESS.” BOSTON GLOBE

In the widely praised film, First Cow, director/writer Kelly Reichardt (Meeks Cutoff, Old Joy, Certain Women) once again trains her perceptive and patient eye on the Pacific Northwest, this time evoking an authentically hardscrabble early nineteenth century way of life.

A taciturn loner and skilled cook (John Magaro) has traveled west and joined a group of fur trappers in Oregon Territory, though he only finds true connection with a Chinese immigrant (Orion Lee) also seeking his fortune; soon the two collaborate on a successful business, although its longevity is reliant upon the clandestine participation of a nearby wealthy landowner’s prized milking cow. From this simple premise Reichardt constructs an interrogation of foundational Americana that recalls her earlier triumph Old Joy in its sensitive depiction of male friendship, yet is driven by a mounting suspense all its own. Reichardt again shows her distinct talent for depicting the peculiar rhythms of daily living and ability to capture the immense, unsettling quietude of rural America. Rated PG13, the film runs 122 minutes. CC.

“Some movies feel dead from the first shot, with or without star power, spectacular vistas or the false energy of hurtling pace. First Cow is vividly alive on arrival and grows into pure enchantment.” Joe Morgenstern, Wall Street Journal

“The joys of First Cow are many. The thoughtful, unshowy textures of its clothes and surroundings. The fabulous chemistry of its two leads. The softly stirring guitar of William Tyler’s score. All of these details add up to a wholly original western, one with its own rhythms, ideas and iconography.” Jake Coyle, AP Press