Loading Events

The most anticipated Native American film in years!

Screens at Ellen Theatre Wednesday, April 25 @ 7:00 pm

Screens at Rialto Bozeman Sunday, April 29 @ 8:45pm

NR. 100 min.

A WHITE AUTHOR GET SUCKED INTO THE HEART OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE AMERICAN LIFE IN THE SPARSE LANDS OF THE THE DAKOTA’S BY A 95 YEAR OLD LAKOTA ELDER.

Once known as the great unmade Native American film in Hollywood, Neither Wolf Nor Dog is adapted from the acclaimed Native American novel by Kent Nerburn and has soared to become the most successful non-Hollywood Native American film in years. This funny and deeply moving film follows an author who gets sucked into the heart of contemporary Native American life in the sparse lands of the Dakotas by a 95-year-old Lakota elder. Kent Nerburn (Christopher Sweeney), a good-hearted, white American family man and writer, receives a mysterious call from a distant Indian reservation regarding an oral history book he made with Red Lake Ojibwe reservation students in northern Minnesota. Despite misgivings, Kent travels across America’s northern plains to arrive at the bleak, poverty-stricken reservation deep in the high plains of the Dakotas. The old man, Dan (95 year-old Dave Bald Eagle, in an unforgettable final performance), who lives alone in a clapboard shack back in the hills with his only real companions—his dog, a close friend named Grover (Richard Ray Whitman) and his granddaughter, Wenonah (Roseanne Supernault)—interrogates Kent as to his motives for working with Indian people. Once satisfied he is not a turquoise clad “wannabe” spouting Indian philosophy, Dan recounts the story of American history from the Native point of view. As the stories pour from Dan, Kent’s understanding of the world is turned upside down. An inanimate landscape comes alive, and a history he thought he knew is called into question.

Directed by British filmmaker Steven Lewis Simpson and shot in 18 days on location at Pine Ridge, Standing Rock, and Cheyenne Indian Reservations, the film shows no sign of slowing its streak of sold out screenings, bolstered by rave reviews from critics around the country such as Minneapolis Star-Tribunes’  Colin Covert, who writes, “By the time the end credits arrive, the characters of this modest, crowd-funded feature are practically unforgettable. It’s immensely serious but no downer.” 95% Rotten Tomato score. Not rated, the film runs 110 minutes.